1. Reblogged from: animated-disney-gifs
  2. Reblogged from: chandra75
  3. sanity-in-wonderland:

I’m not badass

    sanity-in-wonderland:

    I’m not badass

    Reblogged from: chandra75
  4. charlotteemilee:

    sluttiestkitten:

    all girls are fucking beautiful and if you try to make them feel like they aren’t because they have fuzzy legs or chubby bellies fuck you

    Fuck yeah. I love this post.

    Reblogged from: lapetitefillesexuelle
  5. He is with Iron Man

    Reblogged from: chandra75
  6. thefoodpantry:

via: Pinterest - making croissants

    thefoodpantry:

    via: Pinterest - making croissants

    Reblogged from: xosweeties
  7. handsomedogs:


Liz




Hello!

    handsomedogs:

    Hello!
    Reblogged from: kneelformischief
  8. fashionsfromhistory:

Evening Dresses
c.1911-1913
France

The empire style of a straight column of drapery and a high waist was high fashion especially in the years 1912 and 1913. Heavy fringe on delicate fabrics was popular, too, like the white silk fringe and silver beaded fringe on the sleeves and on the train of the green dress. The bodice is trimmed with pale pink pearls and pink chiffon rose buds. The other evening gown has similar proportions with the high waist and short sleeves, although the shape is less angular and more curved, like the swirling feathers “drawn” on the net overskirt in black and silver sequins. However soft they both look, they both are boned in the bodice. Both dresses belonged to Florence Elizabeth Hopwood ‘11 who married the widowed tycoon, Charles William Gates soon after her graduation. Both dresses are likely made in France. (Smith College Historic Clothing Collection)

Smith College Historic Clothing Collection

    fashionsfromhistory:

    Evening Dresses

    c.1911-1913

    France

    The empire style of a straight column of drapery and a high waist was high fashion especially in the years 1912 and 1913. Heavy fringe on delicate fabrics was popular, too, like the white silk fringe and silver beaded fringe on the sleeves and on the train of the green dress. The bodice is trimmed with pale pink pearls and pink chiffon rose buds. The other evening gown has similar proportions with the high waist and short sleeves, although the shape is less angular and more curved, like the swirling feathers “drawn” on the net overskirt in black and silver sequins. However soft they both look, they both are boned in the bodice. Both dresses belonged to Florence Elizabeth Hopwood ‘11 who married the widowed tycoon, Charles William Gates soon after her graduation. Both dresses are likely made in France. (Smith College Historic Clothing Collection)

    Smith College Historic Clothing Collection

    Reblogged from: fashionsfromhistory
  9. nonormynolife:

    Do you know the fact they’re dressing up like a Japanese traditional wedding

    Reblogged from: ladygrimes
  10. fashionsfromhistory:

    Wedding Dress

    1881

    Germanisches Nationalmuseum

    Reblogged from: fashionsfromhistory
  11. allthingseurope:

Cesky Krumlov, Czech Republic (by Wolfgang.Grilz)

    allthingseurope:

    Cesky Krumlov, Czech Republic (by Wolfgang.Grilz)

    Reblogged from: peet-b-shelley
  12. gasstation:

Sofia Vergara in 1998

    gasstation:

    Sofia Vergara in 1998

    Reblogged from: gasstation
  13. fashionsfromhistory:

    Bedroom from the Sagredo Palace

    c.1718

    Italy

    In design and workmanship, this bedroom, consisting of an antechamber with a bed alcove, is one of the finest of its period. The decoration is in stucco and carved wood. In the antechamber, fluted Corinthian pilasters support an entablature out of which fly amorini bearing garlands of flowers. Other amorini bear the gilded frame of a painting by Gasparo Diziani, depicting dawn triumphant over night. Above the entry to the alcove seven amorini frolic, holding a shield with the monogram of Zaccaria Sagredo. A paneled wood dado with a red-and-white marble base runs around the room. The unornamented portions of the walls are covered with seventeenth-century brocatelle. The bed alcove has its original marquetry floor. The stuccowork was probably done by Abondio Statio and Carpoforo Mazetti. The amorini are beautifully modeled and the arabesques of the doors are exquisitely executed. Everything in this bedroom forms a buoyant and joyful ensemble. (MET)

    MET

    Reblogged from: fashionsfromhistory
  14. alixvause:

    alex vause + boobs requested by anon

    thanks to blacklinervause for suggesting scenes!

    Reblogged from: flacamaritza
  15. With six children, she still manages to visit these kinds of countries, traveling lightly, without much security, taking the same bumpy roads and dodgy planes and going through the same military checkpoints as I do when I report from conflict zones. There is no red carpet in Libya or Sudan. She still packs her own flashlights, notebooks, and waterproof gear. She made Blood and Honey with $13 million and a lot of humility. She approached it the way she does her job for UNHCR, like a student.

    "When I go on a field mission, I get multiple briefings, including from the CFR [Council on Foreign Relations]," she said. "And I took a course on international law. So I did the same thing I did with missions. I studied."

    For the film, she “read a lot of books about the war. I talked to a lot of people, I watched, I listened. I just wanted to tell the real story.” She repeated what she has said several times: “I wanted to be respectful of people.” If she did not know something, “I asked.” — Possessed By War by Janine di Giovanni in Newsweek, Dec 12, 2011 [x]

    Reblogged from: champjolie
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